Briar Bayler — Designer
neo.jpg

Typology (Helvetica)

Helvetica is everywhere — it’s on your walk to work, on your clothes, even in your house. Love it or hate it, Helvetica is inescapable. So is it an obsolete default? Or an enduring timeless masterpiece?

For this assignment, 60 pages of copy were provided as plain text and all visual direction and information hierarchy was down to the designer. The brief was to communicate editorial content using advanced typographic techniques and grid composition.

 The outputs were a 60 page printed and bound book, and a dust jacket that unfolded to reveal an A1 poster.  (Above) A1 poster type specimen for Helvetica. The poster focussed on the divide in the typographic community — everyone either loves Helvetica, or hates it. This was explored through the split colour, using red for love and black for hate.   (Below) Dustjacket when lying flat (front cover on left).

The outputs were a 60 page printed and bound book, and a dust jacket that unfolded to reveal an A1 poster.

(Above) A1 poster type specimen for Helvetica.
The poster focussed on the divide in the typographic community — everyone either loves Helvetica, or hates it. This was explored through the split colour, using red for love and black for hate.

(Below) Dustjacket when lying flat (front cover on left).

unfolded cover.jpg
 The overall design of the book was inspired by the heirarchy, grid, and rule system of the New York Transit Authority Standards Manual, due to the well-known use of Helvetica in the NYC subway.

The overall design of the book was inspired by the heirarchy, grid, and rule system of the New York Transit Authority Standards Manual, due to the well-known use of Helvetica in the NYC subway.

t1.png
t2.png
blackletter.jpg
t3.png
t4.png
t7.png
 You can see the full book  here .

You can see the full book here.